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Topic: New home

Aug 21, 2019
Jan 30, 2020

To help you I need to ask a few questions:

1. Do you have a good contract?

2. Does the contract state in writing start time?

3. Do you think you have paid money to the contractor more than the work completed?

4. Does your state require a licence?

5. Is the contractor a friend of your?

Aug 21, 2019
Aug 26, 2019

Hello Katrina, sorry to hear about your experience thus far. Regarding cutting your losses and hiring someone else, all states are different, but a contract cancellation clause should have been outlined in the contractor's contract / scope of work. If it was not spelled out in your contract, you might want to contact the licensing board in your state for additional information. Next step would be contacting an attorney.

Oct 12, 2017

Gene Lewis answered:

Oct 20, 2018

A heating system is best  to keep the home warm and comfortable during the winter.

Oct 12, 2017

Jamie Crouse answered:

Oct 6, 2018

Sometimes the weather can have more of an impact on your home than you know. Therefore, it is important to prepare your home for the winter season. For your central heat, call a heating system maintenance service NJ professional to come clean and inspect your furnace. Be sure to remove any flammable material away from any type of heater. Check your home for any cracks or crevices on the outside of your home and seal them properly. You will also need to check your pipes on the outside and inside.

Oct 12, 2017

Danielle Stone of Lunt Marymor PRO answered:

Oct 19, 2017

One of the best things you can do to prepare your home for the winter is to be sure that your heating system is in proper working order. We encourage our clients to have annual or bi-annual heating inspections before winter begins. This allows any repairs or upgrades to be complete before the first cold night of the year.

Oct 12, 2017

Thank you for your inquiry.  See our website link: http://www.owingsbrothers.com/winterizing-your-home/

Mark Jeanes asked:

Jul 11, 2017
Jul 13, 2017

Mark I'm sorry to hear you're having trouble with your contractor.  I certainly wouldn't understand all of your situation, but I'll try to offer some general advise.

First and foremost you should try to resolve any disputes with your contractor directly.  (I assume you may have already taken this step)  Sometimes it is best to think about listing the reasons for your concerns out in written form and what resolutions you would like.  While you shouldn't expect everything to end up perfectly, knowing what you are looking for is a good start and as a contractor it gives them a place to start working toward a resolution with you.

Second you should work with CCB for your state to resolve your dispute if the first step does not work out.  The CCB is an independent party and will work in the best interest of both parties to try to find a mutually agreeable resolution to the concerns.  Knowing the reasons for your dispute and the resolutions you are seeking will help both the CCB and your contractor in working with you towards a resolution.

Third, if you are unsuccessful in those endeavors you can explore further action based upon the contract you and your contractor signed at the oustet of your project.

Again, I'm sorry to hear of your situation and wish you the best of luck in finding a resolution.

Jun 28, 2017
Jul 11, 2017

From time to time, we get called to evaluate problems with homes, To answer your direct question, "No it's not as unusual as you must think." There are reasons as Christen and Paula have mentioned above, but I also meet home owners who would rather not have the hassle of cleaning backed up gutters, or having to replace them when damaged. There are several reasons for gutters, but in most cases gutters and downspouts simply direct water away from the foundation, and if your surface drainage is adequate they become more of an option.

Yes I think the builder should have been thoughtful enough to metion it to you. As a home owner you rely on professionals like us to guide you through those things and allow you to make knowledgable decisions. I would question them about it, but they are not necessarily wrong for having omitted them, unless they are mentioned in your contract.

Jun 28, 2017

Paula Hickey of Beazer Homes PRO answered:

Jul 1, 2017

Good evening, Denise.

I work for Beazer Homes, a national home builder, and would be happy to answer your question.  While I don't know your specific situation I can address what we do.  Depending upon the specification level of the community you build in gutters are not necessarily included in the base price of your home.  In some communities front gutters are included.  In others, there are downspouts provided.  In yet others full gutters are provided.  You would need to check the specifications that were included in your sales contract.

If you had built your home with a custom builder my thought is that it would be the same - you would need to check your contract.

I hope that helps.

Best regards,

Paula

Jun 28, 2017

Christen Little answered:

Jun 30, 2017

Hello Denise!  Thanks for your question!  Has the siding been completed?  Generally with new construction, the gutters and downspouts are one of the last things to go on a home.  They cannot put the gutters and downspouts up until the home has its siding on it (runs over the top).  If the siding has been completed, then we'd definitely agree that its a bit strange they weren't installed! 

I hope this helps! Please let us know if we can be of any further assistance! 

Have a great weekend! 

Alex Graham asked:

May 14, 2014
Dec 7, 2016

Congrats on the new home! I think you have started off on a really good foundation with open dialog with your new neighbors. A few suggestions. 

Make sure you communicate with your neighbors about you project and how long it will last. Let them know that if there is any concern that they can talk to you about it. Give them an easy way to contact you. 

Have your contractors be respectful. There will obviously be early mornings or late nights for work to be done, but be respectful of your neighbors. Maybe offer some earplugs for them to block out the unwanted noises or ask the guys to start later on a Saturday or Sunday so your neighbors can sleep in. 

Clean up.... Make sure that anyone who is building and installing cleans up after themselves. Cigarette butts, trash, cursing, loud music and loose nails are only some of the concerns of an active work sight. And those concerns grow for neighbors with children.

My biggest suggestion, at the completion of the job have an open house. Invite your neighbors to come see your new house and the project that was goign on next door. It will offer you a time to get to know one another better. Use it as a way to say thanks for dealing with the last few months.Good luck!! 

Nov 15, 2016
Nov 26, 2016

There is mudh information about how to find an architect/designer for new home construction or remodeling additions. Unfortunately, many decisions end up being based on numbers, specifically the cost estimate to prepare the design and specifications. Basing such an important decision and arguably one of the largest investments of your life on mere numbers is at least incomplete and at worst, a potential nightmare scenario.

 It is recommended that  a comprehensive approach be undertaken  that admittedly takes a little more time than just providing an initial cost estimate but one that can result in truly finding the firm for your unique situation and budget.

It starts with identifying what's "right" for you, a unique definition that requires a solid vision for your project and some personal introspection. For instance, if you are planning on undertaking a large whole house remodel or a contemporary/modern design style, you should look at architects and/or design/build firms in your area that specialize in and have a track record of building those types of projects.

Narrow that list by investigating each company's websites, calling their references if available, the Better Business Bureau, and your local building association chapter.

You should consider the types of personalities you like and respond to best.  You won't know if you're 'compatible' until you meet face-to-face. If you're confident in one firm either from your research or a strong referral, you may not feel the need to meet with any other candidates. But if you are truly starting your search from scratch, without a referral from a trusted source, it is suggested that  you develop a short list of 3-4 firms and invite them to make a presentation in your home -- as much to glean their methods as to gauge compatibility and their interest in your project.

At those meetings, be open and honest about your project. If you have a draft fllor plan or inspiration photos, show them. Request that each candidate bring photos of projects that are similar to yours in style and size. Inquire about how they differentiate themselves from their peers.

Finally, ask each candidate on how they price their services and, in turn, share your project budget, There's no sense in trying to forge a good working relationship if you are not forthcoming about what you can afford..

Once you find an architect or design/build firm that's earned your confidence in their skills, understanding of your project, and (most important) their ability to communicate with you, it's time to refine and sign a contract and get them involved in the project as soon as possible. 

Nov 15, 2016

Ask for references and speak to past clients to find out if the architect can design within budget.  Find out if the architect has experience doing residential remodeling.  Get a complete price for the entire design development and construction document package including consultants i.e. engineering, permit processing etc.  Don't pay a retainer until you check hiring an archictect against a design - build firm who will handle the entire process for one fee.

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