Show All
Show Answers
Show Open Questions
Show Most Popular

Recent questions and answers

May 23, 2017
Jul 25, 2017

They are definitely measured differently.  The insert window you would measure inside the existint window frame, which in most cases is built out of 3/4" lumber all the way around.  For a full replacement window, you can remove the interior casing and include that frame within your measurement.  In regards to our answer, better late than never.  If this process becomes a pain in the "sash" simply consult a professional.  Make it a great day!

May 22, 2017
Jul 19, 2017

Beyond the license and insurance questions we all advise our clients to ask, we also believe you should ask about their history.  What exactly makes them an experts....did they go to school are they a generational builder?  What types of projects have they built - and where.  What business qualifications does your contractor have?...... because you may be a great installer but when it comes time for warranty work, will your contractor still be there?  If you are working with a project manager and multiple installers, will you have access to speak with the owner and license holder as well? 

May 22, 2017
Jul 19, 2017

1. What is the full name and address of the company?

 2. Does the company carry insurance?

A contractor should carry comprehensive liability insurance and workers’ compensation insurance* to protect you in the event of an accident. 

There are a variety of reasons why full insurance may not be carried by a contractor, such as:

  • Not a full-time contractor
  • Operates as a partnership or self-employed without employees
  • New in the business
  • Can’t afford insurance premiums
  • Doesn’t stand behind work

It is up to you to determine if it is worth the risk to hire a contractor who does not carry insurance.

3. Is the company a licensed or credentialed contractor? 

4. How long has the company been in business?

5. Will the company provide referrals or references from previous jobs?

Consider checking sources:

  • Local Better Business Bureau (BBB)
  • Social media 
  • Website
  • Google
Jul 6, 2017
Jul 19, 2017

Hello Geoff,

If you are currently using a AC system I would suggest maybe looking into a few different options.

1)Try keeping some blinds closed during the hottest periods of the day (also helps from discolouring your furniture or flooring)

2) Circulating the air with multiple fans - also checking to see if the room is well insulated might prove to be beneficial.

3) check to see if your windows are sealed properly- are there cracks in the frame, do you seep gaps or see outside from the sides of the window etc.

4) If your home is a bit older it might be wise to have your windows checked. (what kind of glass are in your windows are they vinyl etc.)

Changing your homes windows can decrease your energy bill significantly and will help keep the "cool" in during the hotter months and "warmth" in on the cooler months.

Hope this helps!



Mark Jeanes asked:

Jul 11, 2017
Jul 13, 2017

Mark I'm sorry to hear you're having trouble with your contractor.  I certainly wouldn't understand all of your situation, but I'll try to offer some general advise.

First and foremost you should try to resolve any disputes with your contractor directly.  (I assume you may have already taken this step)  Sometimes it is best to think about listing the reasons for your concerns out in written form and what resolutions you would like.  While you shouldn't expect everything to end up perfectly, knowing what you are looking for is a good start and as a contractor it gives them a place to start working toward a resolution with you.

Second you should work with CCB for your state to resolve your dispute if the first step does not work out.  The CCB is an independent party and will work in the best interest of both parties to try to find a mutually agreeable resolution to the concerns.  Knowing the reasons for your dispute and the resolutions you are seeking will help both the CCB and your contractor in working with you towards a resolution.

Third, if you are unsuccessful in those endeavors you can explore further action based upon the contract you and your contractor signed at the oustet of your project.

Again, I'm sorry to hear of your situation and wish you the best of luck in finding a resolution.

May 22, 2017
Jul 11, 2017

Nobody mentioned the most important one: Will you provide a written Contract?

What is your contracting (not business) icense number? Having and active State license answers many other questions, like whether they meet insurance and employment criteria. Everyone who does work in which your particualr State requires a license must be licensed especially for plumbing, HVAC, electrical (including low-voltage), and structural work.

BBB accediting is meaningless, as it only applies if a contractor pays their fee.

Can you provide references for similar work? 

As mentioned above, complaints against a license with the Secretary of State should be noted, but the number and nature should also be noted. There are people out there you just can't please, and who try to scam free work from well-meaning contractors by complaining about them. I have also found that complaints on referal sites like Angie's List and Home Advisor are best ignored altogether as anyone with an axe to grind can post anything about you, whether tru or not. 

Jun 28, 2017
Jul 11, 2017

From time to time, we get called to evaluate problems with homes, To answer your direct question, "No it's not as unusual as you must think." There are reasons as Christen and Paula have mentioned above, but I also meet home owners who would rather not have the hassle of cleaning backed up gutters, or having to replace them when damaged. There are several reasons for gutters, but in most cases gutters and downspouts simply direct water away from the foundation, and if your surface drainage is adequate they become more of an option.

Yes I think the builder should have been thoughtful enough to metion it to you. As a home owner you rely on professionals like us to guide you through those things and allow you to make knowledgable decisions. I would question them about it, but they are not necessarily wrong for having omitted them, unless they are mentioned in your contract.

Jul 6, 2017
Jul 11, 2017

There are severl things to consider first: 1) Was the proper double-paned, Low-E windows made for such a location installed? 2) Is the room properly insulated? 3) Does the existing HVAC unit have the capacity to cool the addition? If all these are yes's then you want to look at an auxillary coolling option. Simply cutting holes in the wall and adding an air-excahning fan may offer some relief, but if your system is being over taxed to cool this oven you will only have limited results. Having not seen the room I can't offer specific suggestions, but the whole project definitely needs to evaluated for the three things mentioned above.

Lastly, our clients facing simlar situations where a room was added, or porch was enclosed without thought of the above found relief with ductless split AC systems. They are very effitcient, quiet, and serve as an auxillary system moderating the extremes. This also gave them the option of closing their "sunrooms" off from teh rest of the house while continuing to keep them comfortable.

Jul 6, 2017
Jul 11, 2017

Hello Geoff,

In fear of giving you information that is obvious or that you already know, we move forward boldly and answer this question.  I had a similar addition on a previous home and it was difficult to keep it cooler in the summer months.  What ended up proving helpful was to put a small box fan on the floor outside of the room to draw the home's air conditioning into that space.  That teamed with controlling the sunlight with window treatments proved effective.  Thanks Geoff!

Jul 6, 2017

Cynthia Miller answered:

Jul 11, 2017

We installed a room window a/c. We are also going to install blaclout shades. Having difficulty finding someone to install the shades due to the materials that the room is made of.. A/C makes the room a dream come true.

Jun 28, 2017

Paula Hickey of Beazer Homes PRO answered:

Jul 1, 2017

Good evening, Denise.

I work for Beazer Homes, a national home builder, and would be happy to answer your question.  While I don't know your specific situation I can address what we do.  Depending upon the specification level of the community you build in gutters are not necessarily included in the base price of your home.  In some communities front gutters are included.  In others, there are downspouts provided.  In yet others full gutters are provided.  You would need to check the specifications that were included in your sales contract.

If you had built your home with a custom builder my thought is that it would be the same - you would need to check your contract.

I hope that helps.

Best regards,

Paula

Jun 28, 2017
Jun 30, 2017

Hello Denise!  Thanks for your question!  Has the siding been completed?  Generally with new construction, the gutters and downspouts are one of the last things to go on a home.  They cannot put the gutters and downspouts up until the home has its siding on it (runs over the top).  If the siding has been completed, then we'd definitely agree that its a bit strange they weren't installed! 

I hope this helps! Please let us know if we can be of any further assistance! 

Have a great weekend! 

Are you a building professional?

Why not answer these questions like a pro?

Sign up free