Show All
Show Answers
Show Open Questions
Show Most Popular

Southern Home Improvement, LLC

Bin Khoo asked:

Jan 11, 2017
Feb 20, 2017

Both of the previous are great ideas. Also consider, if it is an older valve, that the main does not close completely, for a variety of possible reasons. We see that alot in older homes. You can confirm this by checking other fausets to see if they continue to drip after you have tried the above proceedures. 

Remember if you drain the system as suggested before, to properly refill it, to get rid of the air in the system, or you could have "water hammer" issues as well.

Norma Grech asked:

Feb 7, 2017
Feb 20, 2017

Yes, contact the installer. Hae them check it. Just from the sound, it could be anything from a bad heating element, malfunctioning thermostat, to being plumbed backward, to name a few. Either way somone qualified to diagnose and repaitr the problem needs to look at it.

Nov 9, 2016
Nov 29, 2016

In twenty years it only came up once. It was an old house and the owner knew it was substandard. It is taken for granted by most people that a house was built to code and still in sound condition. It would seem logical then if you put the same riding material on the house everything should be alright. There not enough inclination here to even guess what went wrong but you need to get a licensed, or at least certified inspector, and another reputable roofer to evaluate the installing and structure to determine Weiss at fault.

Nov 15, 2016
Nov 29, 2016

The short answer is the percentage of ROI varies by region but, kitchen and bathroom upgrades including new cabinets and countertops always top the list. From there it depends a lot on the house, it's condition, and what you're wanting to do with it.

May 18, 2016
Jul 15, 2016

The above are two good, and siilar in approach answers, but there are two issues it seems no one includes:

1) If you house was built before 1978 it must be inspected by a certified contractor or lead paint inspector for lead paint before a remodel is started. If found the paint, or paintd material must be prperly abated. This can be a significant cost item.

2) Most remodel items like tile, cabinets, and paint are considered minor and don't require it in most jurisdictions, but electrical, plumbing, HVAC, and structural modifications require permits and inspections. A homeowner can save money by omitting them, but if you get busted, you'l pay and you may be without a kitchen for a long time.

Robert Johnson

Southern Home Improvement, LLC

Georgia

Feb 11, 2016
Mar 15, 2016

Depending on the severity of the runoff you might want to contact a Civil Engineer. As an engineer myself, with a specialty in drainage and hydrologythere are many issue to consider when dealing with offsite drainage. For instance if you redirect it on to another property it's possible you could be held liable for any impacts tha occur. Just a thought.

Feb 15, 2016
Mar 15, 2016

Consult a professional.

Whether it's 12" or 12' off the ground there are too many safety and code issues for the average homeowner to tackle. Better to do it right than to regret it later.

Are you a building professional?

Why not answer these questions like a pro?

Sign up free