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Topic: Energy efficiency upgrades

Jan 11, 2018
Feb 13, 2018

As a roofing contractor, of course I am going to suggest an upgrade to your roofing system. And that's not just a biased opinion either. Working with a lot of realtors in our area it has been proven that the roof can be as much as 40% of your curb appeal. Especially when the system incudes things like the right color drip edge on the rakes and eaves, and high profile ridge caps. Both of those items are relatively inexpensive and can make a very noticibale difference compared to homes that don't have them. Selecting the proper type of shingle of course also plays a huge role. About 95% of re-roofs these days use a standard architectural tpye compositions shingle but picking something from the designer line can realy make your home stand apart. Then again, other rof covering options besides ashphalt shingles can make an even greater impact. 

As a GAF Master Elite Copntractor, we are partial to their line of products and I have included a link below to their designer apshpalt series.

Good luck!

http://www.gaf.com/Roofing/Residential/Products/Shingles/Designer

Jan 11, 2018
Feb 11, 2018

I agree with Chris.  The Cost vs Value report is the "go to" guide and is impartial.  Personally, I like to focus on first impressions and curb appeal.  Exterior dressings like corwn mouldings and simple shrub pruning is a great low cost way to give the home a wow factor.

Jan 11, 2018

You might also contact a couple of local realtors to see what people in your area are looking for in the home they want to purchase.

Jan 11, 2018
Jan 12, 2018

Check out the 2018 Cost vs Value Report from Remodeling Magazine.

2018 Remodeling Cost vs Value Report

This will give you an idea of the average return on your investment in the region where you live.

The one factor it will not give you is number of intangibles you may receive from the project you're considering.

  • Lifestyle enhancement
  • Number of years living in your new space
  • New opportunities the space now provides

Make sure those are also part of your equation before making a final decision on the impact a remodeling project may make on the "value" of your home.

Jan 11, 2018
Jan 11, 2018

I would recommend that you look at remodeling magazine. They do an annual study of cost versus value For mini interior and exterior home improvements.

Jul 6, 2017
Jul 31, 2017

You have been getting some great input on your question.  I have a couple of things to add, both new information as well as some variations on themes.

1) Someone mentioned closing the blinds in the room to reduce heat gain. Another option would be to install an exterior shade, awning or trellis to keep heat from getting into the room in the first place.

2) Instead of the black out shades, another option is window film.  Window film is probably less expensive and still allows you the views that you probably have from that room. 3M makes some fabulous products that relect heat and prevents it from entering the room.  They come in various thicknesses and tints that do not detract from the views. 

3)  Another person suggested looking at the age and performance of your windows. While this is an expensive option, it may be the most effective.  There have been so many advancements in window technology. Installing windows with both a low Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) and U-factor, can really make a difference in keeping heat out.  If you replace windows, you could also install some operable windows or a vent to reduce the build up of hot air in the room and actually get it out.  This option would create a "chimney effect," based on the principle that hot air rises, and actually draws hot air out of the room.  Sounds like you have installed some AC in the room which will provide cool air to replace that hot air drawn up and out of the room. 

Best of luck to you, The Allen Construction Team

Jul 6, 2017
Jul 19, 2017

Hello Geoff,

If you are currently using a AC system I would suggest maybe looking into a few different options.

1)Try keeping some blinds closed during the hottest periods of the day (also helps from discolouring your furniture or flooring)

2) Circulating the air with multiple fans - also checking to see if the room is well insulated might prove to be beneficial.

3) check to see if your windows are sealed properly- are there cracks in the frame, do you seep gaps or see outside from the sides of the window etc.

4) If your home is a bit older it might be wise to have your windows checked. (what kind of glass are in your windows are they vinyl etc.)

Changing your homes windows can decrease your energy bill significantly and will help keep the "cool" in during the hotter months and "warmth" in on the cooler months.

Hope this helps!



Jul 6, 2017
Jul 11, 2017

There are severl things to consider first: 1) Was the proper double-paned, Low-E windows made for such a location installed? 2) Is the room properly insulated? 3) Does the existing HVAC unit have the capacity to cool the addition? If all these are yes's then you want to look at an auxillary coolling option. Simply cutting holes in the wall and adding an air-excahning fan may offer some relief, but if your system is being over taxed to cool this oven you will only have limited results. Having not seen the room I can't offer specific suggestions, but the whole project definitely needs to evaluated for the three things mentioned above.

Lastly, our clients facing simlar situations where a room was added, or porch was enclosed without thought of the above found relief with ductless split AC systems. They are very effitcient, quiet, and serve as an auxillary system moderating the extremes. This also gave them the option of closing their "sunrooms" off from teh rest of the house while continuing to keep them comfortable.

Jul 6, 2017
Jul 11, 2017

Hello Geoff,

In fear of giving you information that is obvious or that you already know, we move forward boldly and answer this question.  I had a similar addition on a previous home and it was difficult to keep it cooler in the summer months.  What ended up proving helpful was to put a small box fan on the floor outside of the room to draw the home's air conditioning into that space.  That teamed with controlling the sunlight with window treatments proved effective.  Thanks Geoff!

Jul 6, 2017

Cynthia Miller answered:

Jul 11, 2017

We installed a room window a/c. We are also going to install blaclout shades. Having difficulty finding someone to install the shades due to the materials that the room is made of.. A/C makes the room a dream come true.

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