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Eric Consuegra

Jun 7, 2014
Jul 9, 2014

Hey C.J.,

The manufacturer's installation specifications should specify the type and length of fasteners that should be used with installing the 5 inch foam board.  You may want to contact the local store where you purchased the material for the manufacturer representative in your area. Hope this advice helps!

Eric Consuegra, 

AROCON Roofing and Construction, LLC 

Jun 7, 2014
Jul 9, 2014

Hey C.J.,

It is always important to read the manufacturer's installation instructions for approved fasteners. Depending on the thickness of the foam board, the fasteners may need to be a little longer to penetrate through the studs/sheathing enough. 

Hope this helps!

-Katie

John Ford asked:

Jun 10, 2014
Jul 9, 2014

Hey John, 

A few questions first.

Is the chimney functional?  Is the flu venting anything in the home (i.e. furnace)?  Does the chimney go through the roof, or next to the roof on the eave or rake?

If the chimney is not functional and it does not vent anything in the home, you may want to address the problem at the roof by closing it off.  This will make sure no bugs or water can enter into the home.  If the chimney is through the roof, you will need to tear the structure down below the sheathing, install blocking around the chimney box, and install new sheathing over top the chimney.  Exterminators are always the best experts to call for bug problems.  If they keep coming back, it may be time to try a different company. Hope this helps!

Eric Consuegra

AROCON Roofing and Construction, LLC

May 21, 2014
Jul 9, 2014

Hey William, 

I would say your best bet is to shingle over the vents and edge the vents at eaves. This way you are able to allow for intake and continuous ridge vent for exhaust. Hope this helps!

Eric Consuegra

AROCON Roofing and Construction, LLC

John Ford asked:

Feb 17, 2014
May 14, 2014
Hey John, 
Here's the top three upgrades that I would suggest for your home: 
1. Air Sealing and Insulation:  This improvement always pays off.  No matter if you're trying to keep cold air in your home during the summer or trying to keep it out during the winter, sealing small gaps in your home's shell should be always be a priority.
2. Upgrade older appliances:  A majority of our energy usage comes from the use of our appliances so if you are still working with an older model, it might be time to consider the cost benefit of upgrading to a newer, more efficient system.  Each appliance, from dishwashers to clothes dryers each have a different return on investment so be sure to do your research before upgrading.
3. Heat and Cool Efficiently:  On average, 52% of energy used in the home is used to heat and cool our homes. There are a lot of simple steps that can be done to maximize efficiency in this area.  Install and use a programmable thermostat.  Changing the temperature of your home by just 1 degree can help save 5% annually on your heating cost. Be sure that your heating and air conditioning system is being maintained and cared for.  Clean your filter regularly and schedule annual maintenance to prevent possible issues.  Lastly, seal any leaks in your duct system to avoid heating and cooling loss and to allow your system to run better.
Hope the information helps!
-Eric Consuegra, AROCON Roofing & Construction
Feb 17, 2014
Apr 29, 2014

Hey Andy, 

When dealing with contractors out of state, communication is key. I would suggest that email updates be sent by the builder on a weekly basis accomapined by photos of the progress. You should also plan on making personal sites visits as often as possible to ensure quality control. Hope this helps with your project!

Cheers, 

Eric Consuegra, AROCON Roofing and Constrcution, LLC

Alex Graham asked:

Feb 17, 2014
Apr 29, 2014

Hey Alex, 

?I would say that close cell spray foam insulation is the way to go if your budget allows for it.  Although it's much more expensive than batt insulation, the long term savings on your energy bills will be far greater.? Hope this helps! 

Cheers, 

Eric Consuegra, AROCON Roofing and Construction, LLC

Feb 17, 2014
Mar 12, 2014

Bekah, 

I woulld consult with a professional painting company for more information., however in my experience when encountering brick chimneys which have been painted, I have seen cases where moisture was trapped behind the paint causing the brick to deteriorate and flake off.  Again, a painting company may be able to recommend a specific paint that will be appropriate for this application. Hope this helps!

Eric Consuegra, Arocon Roofing and Construction, LLC

Feb 17, 2014
Mar 12, 2014

Hey Michael,

Here's a quick guide to show your the pros and cons of having asphalt roof shingles applied over your existing roof: 

Pros:
-Reduced labor cost & reduced dump fees which brings the overall project cost down roughly 15% or so depending on the type of roof.
-2 Layers are the maximum number of layers allowed by code in most areas.
Cons:
-You cannot inspect all sheathing to verify a solid nailing surface.
-You also cannot change the underlayment or install ice and water shield / moisture guard to the eaves and valleys direct to plywood.
-Lastly, heat usually builds up between the layers and tends to suffocate the top layer causing pre-mature roof aging.  Ventillation plays a big role in a roof-over application. 
Generally speaking, I would say that roof-over application is not recommended due to cost vs. overall value.....especially if you are planning on staying in the home 10+ years. Hope this helps!
Eric Consuegra, Arocon Roofing and Construction, LLC

Alex Graham asked:

Feb 17, 2014
Mar 12, 2014

Alex,  

Solar panels are a great long term solution for energy savings. The average time frame for recovering the initial cost of the panels and installation is about 5 years, so if you are planning on living in the home for longer than 5 years, you will begin to see a return on your investment around year 6 and beyond. Also a big bonus is that tax credits are available to homeowners on both the state and federal level for solar currently!

Hope this helps! Good luck with your new home =)

Eric Consuegra, Arocon Roofing and Construction

Feb 24, 2014
Mar 12, 2014

Hey Scott, 

I would say the best course of action would be to contact a certified mold remediation company and set up an inspection to determine if mold is present, because you never know what kind of mold it may be and it's better to be safe than sorry! 

Hope this helps!

Eric Consuegra, Arocon Roofing and Construction, LLC 

Feb 17, 2014
Mar 5, 2014

Hey Jerrod, 

When installing replacement windows, the existing window frame remains and the replacement window is installed inside the existing frame.  This causes the glass area to shrink slightly to accommodate the new window.  When installing a "new construction window", the entire window unit including sash and frame is removed down to the rough opening and the complete assembly is replaced which includes a nailing flange which has to be secured to the exterior wall.  Installing new construction windows is a much more complex project since the siding on the exterior has to be removed in order to secure the nail flange to the wall.  Most consumers go with the replacement window do to the ease and cost of installation as compared to the new construction window option. Hope this helps!

Eric, Arocon Roofing& Construction

John Ford asked:

Feb 17, 2014
Mar 5, 2014

Sagging gutters can be an easy fix depending on the severity / condition of the existing material.  Hidden hangers in the appropriate size (5" or 6") can be used to lift up the sagging areas in order to secure to the fascia boards and tighten as needed.  If the gutters are severely warped or bent from ice dams and / or debris, then replacement is recommended.  Contacting a professional to take care of this service is recommended unless the homeowner has experience working from ladders in order to avoid injury.

Eric, Arocon Roofing & Construction

Feb 17, 2014
Mar 5, 2014
Every roof system is different and the length of time that the shingles last depends upon many factors such as ventilation, roof pitch, direct sunlight vs. shade etc.  In Maryland, a 20 year shingle typically lasts 15-17 years due to the extreme heat and extreme cold climate changes.  I would say that if the original shingles on the home were rated for 20 years, chances are it's ready for replacement.  When homeowners push the limits of the roof....they normally end up spending way more money for the replacement due to the plywood damage which results from waiting too long.
Eric, Arocon Roofing & Construction

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