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Topic: Interior painting

Apr 6, 2017
Jun 27, 2017

I would concur with the above answers.  If you are able to fill with wood putty and paint that would prove to be the most cost effective option.  If you would like to go further, determine the brand of the door and I'm sure you could find a replacement sash.  I am like you, I love my dog like my children, continue to be patient and show your bowser the love he deserves.

Apr 6, 2017
Apr 7, 2017

There are a few options depending on the circumstances, if the dog has scratched the slab and depending on material, you'll need an entirely new slab. You have the option of painting over the scratch, but the odds of that peeling into the future are high. Our doors are steel and fibreglass, fibreglass would require an entirely new door slab to be installed if you wish to rid the problem for good. To surely rid the problem, the dog or puppy should be trained before repair unless you want to experience a fruitness endeavour. 

When dealing with a wooden door, their are a few DIY solutions like sanding, filling sanding again and painting/staining over. 

It looks like the pup teaches classes on how to be a beaver 101. Sanding, filling and matching the colour back would be the best option in this circumstance, or simply an entirely new replacement. 

Apr 6, 2017
Apr 6, 2017

It looks like the dog did a pretty good job on the door. Since the door is painted, you could sand the area down with some 150 grit sand paper. After it is sanded then you can apply some High performance wood filler or car bondo.

Apply a thin layer over the damaged area and allow it dry ( a few minutes or more depending on the amount of hardener you use). After it is dry, sand untill smooth and then apply a second layer if you need to and then sand smooth. After the area is the way you want it, prime it and paint it. 

Jan 30, 2017
Feb 1, 2017

As a basement finishing company we're seeing a lot of granite for wet bars, lighter colors. Bathrooms and tile are often favoring gray. Brushed nickel and steel are the most common hardware and fixtures. Clean,simple, easy to mix up with rustic or modern decor.

Jan 30, 2017
Jan 30, 2017

We're still seeing a lot of demand for granite and/or quartz countertops.  With the quartz, people are doing more subtle patterns and a lot of marble looks (white with light veining or similar).  Cabinets seem to be following a gray/neutral/white color palette, with lots of clean lines.  We're still seeing stainless steel and brushed nickel for appliances and hardware, however we saw quite a bit of matte brass and gold tones at KBIS this year.  That seems to be making a comeback, but I think that might still depend on your area.  I think oil-rubbed bronze is probably on its way out, unless you're doing a rustic look.  Hope that helps!    

David Pratt asked:

Apr 7, 2016
Jul 26, 2016

We have a painter that we use for all of our projects that involve staining or painting.  Painting Pro LLC.  One of the best we have seen and used for many years.  Let me know if you would like to contact him and I can send you his contact info.

David Pratt asked:

Apr 7, 2016
Jun 1, 2016

CertaPro Painters- it’s a nationwide franchise. See their trucks all over. Never used them, but heard only good things so far. Good luck! … and let us know ;)

Tom Gunter asked:

Jan 14, 2015
Jan 15, 2015

Here is the very short answer, but has been effective over the past decade and a half.

Start with Warm Soapy Water (Should probably get the majority depending on the density of the spill) and if that is not enough fire power use Denatured Alcohol.  Always try to avoid chemicals if possible as different carpet reacts differently to chemicals depending on the actual material and dye they use.   

Tom Gunter asked:

Jan 14, 2015
Jan 14, 2015

Hello Zack,

As a painting company with a few thousand interior painting projects under our belt we've had a couple drops of paint on carpeting over the years. We take two courses of action:

1. We start with the absolute most gentle process possible. Soap and water on a cotton cloth dabbing the spot. Don't ever rub or smear the area as it could result in spreading rather than removing the stain.

2. If we're not able to remove the paint this way we call in a professional. There are too many variables when it comes to carpeting chemistry and weave to risk making the problem worse and ending up with a large carpet replacement bill to gamble.

Carpet cleaners have an entire arsenal of cleaning materials, equipment, and specialized knowledge when it comes to removing stains.

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