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Topic: Commercial

May 30, 2019
May 31, 2019

Generally speaking the roofline actually determines where the gutters are supposed to be. Whenever there is water flow coming off the home there should be gutters and it should be all around the home. So, unless your home was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and it has the proper underground drainage built-in, you should contact your local gathering contractor.

Apr 15, 2019
Apr 22, 2019

I would rather think your gutter needs a good sealant. If your soffit is sagging, you have some structural issues.Most likely nothing to do with the gutter. 

Apr 15, 2019
Apr 17, 2019

The most important thing would to review its structual integrity. This can be accomplished by removing some of the soffit panels and taking a peak inside. It could be a a rafter tail is comprimised or broken. Therefore, it would need to be fixed by lifting and sistering. (placing dimensional lumber beside the rafter tail and fastening together). Another fix would be to install a column to support the roof. Installing the column would require a stable footing below, (a concrete pad) and lifting the roof to the proper slope and affixing the colum to the sub-fascia board on the eave. The column method would provide the best support over time and combat heavy snow loads, however a "post" would be in the walk path most likely.

Tapas Bose asked:

Jan 9, 2019
Jan 15, 2019

Just behind the valve handle there is a "packing nut" that sucures the shut off valve into the body of the unit. Take a cresent wrench and tighten up that nut and this should stop that leak. No need to pay for a plumber.

Tapas Bose asked:

Jan 9, 2019

Gregory Brown answered:

Jan 10, 2019

I think there is a plumbing problem. I would suggest you to take help from plumber. You can call them and they will see if there is any problem. I hire commercial plumbing service NJ experts to solve plumbing problems. You can also look for a plumbing expert in your area and solve this issue.

Nia Nelson asked:

Oct 26, 2017
Oct 26, 2017

Hello Nia,

Please give us a call, 469-569-3551. We are a general contractor that specializes in storm restoration. We can handle any project, from the roof to interior repair.

Matt

Donna James asked:

Oct 22, 2016

Generally, if there is not a work comp policy in place, you can indeed sue the homeowner. In fact your insurance company might choose to do so, with or without your cooperation! Likewise, if anyone up the chain of command has a work comp policy, that policy could be liable. If you work for a sub who doesn't have work comp, but the general contractor does, then their work comp is probably liable.

So... HOMEOWNERS! This is why it is so important for you to be sure that you hire a contractor who carries a work comp policy. And better yet, that contractor should ensure that it's subcontractors also carry a work comp policy. Otherwise, YOU can be sued by an employee, a subcontractor, the general contractor, or the health insurance company or other insurance company of anyone injured! Good luck on this.

One of my staff made this video to illustrate the situation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H9-DXPigSXA

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