Show All
Show Answers
Show Open Questions
Show Most Popular

Topic: Remodel or renovation

Jan 11, 2018
Feb 13, 2018

As a roofing contractor, of course I am going to suggest an upgrade to your roofing system. And that's not just a biased opinion either. Working with a lot of realtors in our area it has been proven that the roof can be as much as 40% of your curb appeal. Especially when the system incudes things like the right color drip edge on the rakes and eaves, and high profile ridge caps. Both of those items are relatively inexpensive and can make a very noticibale difference compared to homes that don't have them. Selecting the proper type of shingle of course also plays a huge role. About 95% of re-roofs these days use a standard architectural tpye compositions shingle but picking something from the designer line can realy make your home stand apart. Then again, other rof covering options besides ashphalt shingles can make an even greater impact. 

As a GAF Master Elite Copntractor, we are partial to their line of products and I have included a link below to their designer apshpalt series.

Good luck!

http://www.gaf.com/Roofing/Residential/Products/Shingles/Designer

Jan 11, 2018
Feb 11, 2018

I agree with Chris.  The Cost vs Value report is the "go to" guide and is impartial.  Personally, I like to focus on first impressions and curb appeal.  Exterior dressings like corwn mouldings and simple shrub pruning is a great low cost way to give the home a wow factor.

Jan 11, 2018

You might also contact a couple of local realtors to see what people in your area are looking for in the home they want to purchase.

Jan 11, 2018
Jan 12, 2018

Check out the 2018 Cost vs Value Report from Remodeling Magazine.

2018 Remodeling Cost vs Value Report

This will give you an idea of the average return on your investment in the region where you live.

The one factor it will not give you is number of intangibles you may receive from the project you're considering.

  • Lifestyle enhancement
  • Number of years living in your new space
  • New opportunities the space now provides

Make sure those are also part of your equation before making a final decision on the impact a remodeling project may make on the "value" of your home.

Jan 11, 2018
Jan 11, 2018

I would recommend that you look at remodeling magazine. They do an annual study of cost versus value For mini interior and exterior home improvements.

May 22, 2017
Oct 23, 2017

When you are looking for a professional contractor to successfully bring your home remodeling project to life, you need to make sure you do your homework.

Below are 6 things to consider before hiring a contractor:

1.What is their track record? How long have they been working in the area?

Check out the home remodeling companies you are considering on the Better Business Bureau’s website as well as other sites like Angie’s List. Read testimonials on review websites and look over company websites for portfolios and comments from past clients.

2.What are their credentials? Are they licensed? Bonded? Insured?


States set their own requirements about licenses, but most states have an agency that homeowners can contact to confirm a contractor’s license and credentials. Ask for proof of bonding to make sure your contractor is current on his/her credentials. Insurance puts the liability on the contractor if something goes wrong during the project. Not all insurance is created equal, make sure to ask for a copy of their insurance certificate to verify they have General Liability, Workers’ Compensation, and Auto coverages.

3.Do they have references? Will they provide you with a past client list?

Use a past client list to talk with the people your client has worked with before. Ask them if the contractor delivered what was promised on time and at the agreed upon budget. Also ask about how easy or difficult it was to communicate with the contractor.

4.How will they communicate with you? How do you reach them after hours?

Make sure you agree on how you will communicate with your contractor and if you need weekly in person meetings to get your questions answered.

5.Will they be getting all the required building permits for the project?

While the homeowner pays the cost of the building permits, the contractor should be the one responsible for obtaining the permits.

6.How will the payment schedule be arranged?

For replacement work never pay the entire amount before the project starts. Payment schedules vary from company to company, but there is usually a deposit and payment installments based on certain stages of completion.

Just as you are asking questions about your contractor, your contractor will be asking questions about you and your home remodeling project. It is important that you are aware of the questions your contractor should NOT be asking you.

Sometimes a contractor is trying to find out information about a project, but he/she may phrase questions in a way that makes the homeowner feel uncomfortable.

Listed below are some questions your contractor should NOT ask you:

1.Are you widowed?

2.Do you have money in your savings account?

3.How much money do you make?

4.Will you be alone when I arrive?

5.What is your credit score?

6.May I see your other bids before I present mine?

In Angie Hicks’s article, “3 Questions Your Contractor Shouldn’t Ask,” from Angie’s List she explains how home improvement contractors can be more tactful when they request information from clients.

Check out the article here: https://www.angieslist.com/articles/3-questions-your-contractor-shouldnt-ask.htm

Oct 15, 2017

We are not a fan of wood behind the range or cooktop unless it is electric maybe even induction.

Apr 6, 2017
Sep 18, 2017

As with the previous comments, you can use sandpaper to smooth out some of the damage, but be sure to rub the scratches along the grain of the wood. Next, apply mineral spirits (these are solvents made from paint thinner and petroleum) over the sanded area. Spread on wood filler with a Spackle knife to the damaged parts and allow it to dry as per the filler’s directions. After the wood filler has dried, lightly sand the area once again and brush away any dust before priming and painting your door.

While the image shows damage to the inside of your door, your pet may try scratching on the outside of door and its weather stripping in an attempt to be let inside. In order to prevent future damage to that part of your door, you can add a piece of vinyl lattice that matches the color of your doorframe. Cut the lattice to the length of the doorjamb. Place it over your foam weather stripping. Check to see that your door continues to close properly. Use finishing nails every foot to tack the vinyl lattice securely in place. A small amount of spackling will cover up the nail heads. Now the lattice will protect your weather stripping from further damage.


The right type of door for your home can make a huge difference. We install ProVia doors and they offer DuraGuard Series Storm Doors, which are ideal for keeping pets safely inside with their non-removable stainless steel screening.  

Best of luck with your dog and your door repair! 

Jul 26, 2017
Aug 6, 2017

If you have the extra space, and depending on its use, a walk-in pantry is a luxurious upgrade. In most cases, where floor space is at a premium, pantry cabinets are the best bet. Looking a a bank of finely crafted cabinets is also much more applealing than a closet door.

As for cost, you get more for your dollar with cabinets as well. Framing a drywall closet with fixed-shelves may be slightly cheaper, but much of that cost is labor. We advise the client to put the money in the product.

When you add pull-outs to anything the cost rises exponentially. It's improtant in the design process to determine a good balance between accessibility and organization to avoid unnessisary cost overruns. 

Jul 26, 2017
Jul 27, 2017

The small walk in pantry will be the less expensive option. However, having a cabinet that functions as a pantry is often a better use of space and ends up as the more preferred option by my clients.

But it's all about you (or your client)! What would you/they prefer? Is the storage space best utilized with just simple open shelving? or would it be organized best with pull-outs and drawers? There are obvious pros and cons to each, in my experience - the extra cost of a cabinet wins 90% of the time. 

Are you a building professional?

Why not answer these questions like a pro?

Sign up free