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Topic: Plumbing

Willa Price asked:

Mar 17, 2017
Mar 27, 2017

Willa, we recommend speaking with a professional plumber in your area. They will be able to assist with the purchase and install of a water softener to help with the hard water you are experiencing.

Norma Grech asked:

Feb 7, 2017
Mar 2, 2017

I would start by performing a flow test at your shower head. Get a 5 gallon bucket and open your shower head full open and time how long it takes to fill bucket. If you fill the bucket say in 1 minute, this means you are emptying 50 gallon tank in less than 10 minutes. (Divide 50 by number of minutes) Keep in mind as you use hot water, it is replaced with cold water, so hot water temp is dropping from the moment you start. Secondly, you most likely temper your hot water with cold which then extends this time. In short this is just a guide but tells you how long it takes to empty tank. If this works out that your emptying bucket in shorter time than your shower, concider checking flow restrictor on your shower head. If this is not the case then call the installer of hot water heater.  

Bin Khoo asked:

Jan 11, 2017
Feb 20, 2017

Both of the previous are great ideas. Also consider, if it is an older valve, that the main does not close completely, for a variety of possible reasons. We see that alot in older homes. You can confirm this by checking other fausets to see if they continue to drip after you have tried the above proceedures. 

Remember if you drain the system as suggested before, to properly refill it, to get rid of the air in the system, or you could have "water hammer" issues as well.

Norma Grech asked:

Feb 7, 2017
Feb 20, 2017

Yes, contact the installer. Hae them check it. Just from the sound, it could be anything from a bad heating element, malfunctioning thermostat, to being plumbed backward, to name a few. Either way somone qualified to diagnose and repaitr the problem needs to look at it.

Bin Khoo asked:

Jan 11, 2017
Jan 16, 2017

Hello Bin,

If you have not done so already, it helps to drain the system at the lowest point.  Meaning apply the shut off valve first, open the faucet at the lowest point (usually in the basement or hose bib) so the system can drain, then open a faucet at the highest point.  This will allow air into the system and allow it to drain more quickly.  Much like releasing your finger off the top of a full drinking straw.

We hope it helps!

Bin Khoo asked:

Jan 11, 2017
Jan 13, 2017

It depends on the faucet and whether the faucet has an aereator. Even when the valve is turned into the off positions, there is still some residual water in the faucet, and aereator. Once all of the water on the room side of the faucet has drained out, the dripping will stop. 

Dec 24, 2016
Jan 11, 2017

If the tue does not leak when it is sitting full of water, try looking at the seal around the fill spouts and on/off handles.  We see a lot of leaks in those areas in tubes that are 15 or more years old.  

Dec 24, 2016

1) Fiberglass tubs are notorious for getting hairline cracks that usually open up when someone is standing in it with the water running.

2) Also it might be a leak from upstream (plumbing behind the walls going in) such as a leaking copper pipe or loose pex fitting. It could also be in your drainage as well. 

3) Is it a one piece shell? Sometimes fiberglass units come in 1, 2 or more pieces and can leak at the seams. Use a sealant to fil in these seams if you have any. 

4) I've actually seen windows in a tub unit leak rain, etc behind the unit and it appeared as if the tub was leaking. 

Your best bet may be to pull out the unit and see where the leaking appears to be happening. 

Good luck! 

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