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Topic: Insulation & drywall

Dec 28, 2018
Feb 11, 2019

Search for a door protection kick plate. This will cover current damage and protect for any future...

John Ford asked:

Feb 17, 2014
Feb 4, 2019

Depending on what year your house was built, you might have asbestos in that popcorn ceiling. Typically, anything older than 1979 is a good chance that it could have asbestos; our company regularly finds that with popcorn ceilings. We always send a environmental hygenist out to our jobs to confirm whether or not a house is "hot" for asbestos. It's preventative protection for our workers.

Removing popcorn ceilings requires a lot of preparation to prevent contamination of the other areas of your home. You will need to cordon off the area (room) with some kind of plastic covering the walls, floor, and entry area - this is for your own protection. Also, you will need to wear personal protective equipment including a tyvex type of suit that covers you from head to toe, gloves, safety glasses, and most importantly - a respirator. These things are necessary to keep you safe from breathing in the microscopic fibers of asbestos and preventing you from getting asbestosis or mesothelioma (a tumor of the mesothelium, often malignant and thought to be caused most commonly by the inhalation of asbestos particles.)

John Ford asked:

Feb 17, 2014
Jan 17, 2019

John,

If it is a small repair, you may want to test out a product at Lowes.  Homax ceiling texture.  I'd suggest trying it on a scrap piece of drywall (make sure it's at ceiling height for testing).  Jayme and Phillip both had great ideas.  Perhaps yet another would be to just remove the popcorn all together.

Dec 28, 2018
Jan 11, 2019

Samantha,

Typicaly most repairs are noticable and replacement it best.  If you simply need to cove the hole and this is a typical way you keep puppy indoors, you may consider purchasing a piece of metal to cover the hole and prevent more damage.  Home Depot #800537 is a quick idea.   

Dec 5, 2018
Dec 17, 2018

The caulking mentioned is fine to seals the gape but you may need somethingto back it other thatn backer rod. in that case you may need a small amount of Rockwool insulation to pack into the void befor applying the caulk. This is a link to the product https://www.rockwool.com/applications/exterior-walls/firestopping/

If you only need a small amount check with a local insulation company to see if they will sell or even give you the smaill quanity you need.

Dec 5, 2018
Dec 6, 2018

Good Morning,

Nice space.  Its hard to tell from the photos just how big the space needing to be filled is however 

Dap 18854 High Heat Mortar Raw Building Material, Black

should work well. It can likey be found at you local hardware store of online

https://www.amazon.com/18854-Mortar-Building-Material-Black/dp/B0006MXS4C/ref=asc_df_B0006MXS4C/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=167127061369&hvpos=1o5&hvnetw=g&hvrand=16226564078373131268&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9032160&hvtargid=pla-307130896304&psc=1

Best of luck and Happy Holidays

Jared

Sep 29, 2017
Oct 4, 2017

Per ANSI/IICRC S500 Standards and Reference Guide.

"Restorers should consider drywall restoation when it can e verified that no structural integrity has been lost.  Dywall can be restoragle if the water is Category 1 or 2, there is no obvious swelling, seams are intact, and there is no idication of fungal growth.  Drywall should be replaced when contaminated with Category 3 water, damage is obvious (e.g., swelling, seam sagging, seperation), fungal growth is present on paper coverings on either side, or when blown-in insulation materials behind the drywall have likely packed down."

Sep 29, 2017
Sep 29, 2017

The drywall that has water damage should be removed. The wood studs might also need to be replaced depending on if there is mold or rot. The insulation behind the drywall should also be replaced. The base molding might also need replacing as well as the flooring.  

Bryan Jones asked:

Mar 24, 2017

Brent Roper of Ropa Roofing PRO answered:

Apr 25, 2017

Blow in, but will have to hide it with a new ceiling I believe...

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