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Topic: Handyman

Alex Graham asked:

Feb 17, 2014
Mar 24, 2016

Windows and doors are the largest culprit in lost of energy efficiency. It may not be the cheapest option but will provide you with the largest impact.

C E asked:

Jul 16, 2015
Jul 20, 2015

Sorry to hear about your alarm wires.  There are a couple of differenct ways to go about resolving this issue.  We typically involve the servicing alarm company to make sure whatever is done to resolve the issue is accordance with their servicing the alarm system at the home.  They will be respoinsible and liable for the monitoring, so it is critical to involve them.  If possible to pull some additional length at the point of contact is helpful, or splicing on additional length is an option too.  If the wire issue gets too complicated, you may consider a wireless system.

I hope you found this helpful.  Please contact us directly of we can be of any service to you. john@assurancebuilders.com.

C E asked:

Jul 16, 2015
Jul 16, 2015

Veery few windows and doors have alarm sensors on them these days. Most monitoring is done with wireless motion sensors that cover windows and doors / entry points to the House. If you really want to have sensors on the windows then a good electrician will be able to extend the low voltage wires.

Dennis Gehman

Gehman Design Remodeling

www.gehmanremodeling.com

Harleysville, PA 19438

Alex Graham asked:

Feb 17, 2014

Bruce Wiegan of BNW Builders PRO answered:

Apr 18, 2015

Make sure that your attic is properly insulated.  Make sure the seals around all windows and doors are in good shape.  If you can see daylight air is entering and leaving as well.

Alex Graham asked:

Feb 17, 2014
Jan 13, 2015

All of the answers given were great options. There are many, many ways to improve a home's energy efficiency. As we are a siding and window company, my focus will be on those areas. Windows are a huge energy loss/gain. Did you know that windows and doors account for approximately 50% of your heating/cooling loss? Air leaks around a window or door due to a crack of 1/16" of an inch is like having a hole in your wall the size of a brick. In the average home, that is equal to about 15 bricks. Consider how large that "hole" is in your home. The glass package is the most important thing to consider when replacing windows. Most folks just look at the cost of the window and install, and some smoke and mirrors some companies like to drag on about. A smart homeowner knows what Low-E is, what a good U-Factor rating is, whether or not it's single, double or triple pane glass, etc. etc. Same features apply to most doors. Lastly, siding is another area where a homeowner can save money. Check into insulated siding. Check to see what kind of underlayment is being applied to your home. Many companies don't even put a housewrap on to save cost and the average homeowner never knows. Make sure you only hire someone who is appropriately licensed and insured. Ask to see those documents. Hope this helps folks looking to replace siding, windows or doors! Happy remodeling!

Alex Graham asked:

Feb 17, 2014
Dec 6, 2014

The most cost effective things that you can do to improve your homes energy efficiency will depend on the existing condition of your building envelope, the efficiency of your equipment, and humiditiy control.

Addressing the condition overhead and tightening the building envelope are basic principles involved in maintaining efficient temperture control in the home. Thermal imaging will clearly indicate areas of major heat loss.

There are many types of structures and styles of thermal barriers. Therefore, you are best advised to have an energy consultant from a Home Energy Rating Service HERS evaluate of your particular home and assist in identifying the weakness of your home envelope and machanical equipment. Such a report  can provide you with a roadmap to begin taking steps to improve the overall efficiency of the home. 

Alex Graham asked:

Feb 17, 2014
Dec 2, 2014

Hello Alex, 

One alternative that most homeowners are not aware yet is reviewing your Roofing System. Along with the attic insulation, the type of roof you have can make a huge difference on how energy efficient your home is.

Most roofing materials (especially asphalt composite roofs) absorb solar energy and transfer heat to your home (requiring more air-conditioning during summer). On the other hand, energy efficient Metal Roofs are reflective and emissive. They bounce most of the sun's visible and UV light - meaning less heat transferred to your home. Independent studies show energy savings of up to 25%.

The Interlock Metal Roofing System is Energy Star certified (US only). More than energy efficient, our roofs are truly sustainable, being made of up to 95% recycled material, reducing the dependence of asphalt and stopping the cycle of old roofing material going to landfills. It is a lifelong solution that is better for your home, your pocket and the planet.

Alex Graham asked:

Feb 17, 2014
Attic Insulation

Are your heating & cooling bills going through the roof? Did you know that up to 40% of a home’s conditioned air escapes through the attic? Adding attic insulation is the most effective thing you can do to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

John Ford asked:

Feb 17, 2014
Oct 24, 2014

Hey John! 

Try searching on this webiste http://www.lampsplus.com/products/light-bulbs/ they offer a pretty good selection of different bulbs for all of your lighting needs! 

Hope this helps! 

Alex Graham asked:

Feb 17, 2014

Lane Baker of Saltwater Homes PRO answered:

Sep 27, 2014

I really noticed a difference in my electric bill when I put in a programable thermostat for my HVAC. I tend to keep the air down low and would forget to turn it up when I went to work. The new thermostat does that for me. 

John Ford asked:

Jun 10, 2014
Aug 4, 2014

John,

When you see the wasps around, look at the exterior of the chimney and possibly from a ladder.

What you may see is that they are not coming down into the chimney through the top or chimney termination but in through small cracks in the brick where the mortor has come loose.  I would spray the area for the wasps, wait a resonable amount of time and seal the crack and then purchase and install a http://www.woodlanddirect.com/Chimney/Top-Sealing-Chimney-Dampers/Chimalator-Top-Sealing-Chimney-Damper  lock top type chimney cap. 

Thanks

Philip Anderson

HDR Remodeling.

John Ford asked:

Feb 17, 2014
Jul 24, 2014

Hire a reliable electrician who has many years of experience. Do not settle for the best price.

John Ford asked:

Jun 10, 2014
Jul 9, 2014

Hey John, 

A few questions first.

Is the chimney functional?  Is the flu venting anything in the home (i.e. furnace)?  Does the chimney go through the roof, or next to the roof on the eave or rake?

If the chimney is not functional and it does not vent anything in the home, you may want to address the problem at the roof by closing it off.  This will make sure no bugs or water can enter into the home.  If the chimney is through the roof, you will need to tear the structure down below the sheathing, install blocking around the chimney box, and install new sheathing over top the chimney.  Exterminators are always the best experts to call for bug problems.  If they keep coming back, it may be time to try a different company. Hope this helps!

Eric Consuegra

AROCON Roofing and Construction, LLC

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