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Topic: Entry doors

Pamela Hege asked:

Jan 13, 2015
Dec 30, 2016

The fact that you can lift the door to get it to latch tells me that it is likely the installer did not install long screws through the top hinge into the 2" x 4" or 2" x 6" that creates your opening in your wall. Often installer rely on nails to support the weight of the door, but nails will allow the door to sag over a period of time. Verify that there is at least one, but preferabbly two long (2" at least) screws through the top hinge. If not, you can use a cordless drill driver to run the screws in. This usually easily draws the door back up to where it belongs. This is rarely caused by a foundation issue, or cause for a new door.

Nov 28, 2016
Dec 30, 2016

You can put a small tack on the top of the door and hang a piece of fishing line down from that to attach the wreath to. Make sure the tack does not stick up high enough to hit the top jamb of the door. We use this method to hang wreaths on the front doors of our model homes. It does not leave any kind of mark when we remove the wreath. 

Nov 28, 2016
Dec 7, 2016

We would suggest that in order not to damage a door, that you use an over the door hanger. An even bigger suggestion with an over the door hanger is adding a self adhesive felt dot to the back where it touches the door so if the hanger shifts it doesn't rub the paint off of your door. A hanger tends to be more weight tolerant and can be easily removed.

Another option is a commend hook, but you do risk it not holding and even though they claim to come off clean it can peel paint. 

Nov 28, 2016
Nov 29, 2016

It would be in the best interest of maintaining the quality of the material to use an over the door wreath hanger. Happy Holidays 

Nov 28, 2016
Nov 29, 2016

We are fond of hanging wreaths on front doors with over the door wreath hangers. This will prevent damage to your front door. Happy Holidays!

Feb 17, 2016
Mar 7, 2016

Use plumbing soder that comes in a roll.  Break off a piece and put in the hole then put the screw back in. 

Feb 17, 2016

I am assuming it is a standard steel entry door handset.  If the screws are not striped, simply tighten the screws as you would on any entry or passage set.

john barton asked:

Aug 13, 2015
Dec 18, 2015

I live in northern Mass along the coast and deal with this all the time. It really is a question of your commitment to maintenance. Wood today is not like wood 20 years ago or older and lead removed from finishes has change how they perform too. Other suggest the fiberglass or metal option for those reasons.

But if your set on wood then opt for the Fir Door. And it sounds like you're looking at an authentic divide light door but still go for insulated glass don't make the mistake of not using the best glass you can afford

Make sure that it is finished before it is installed and that the coating whether paint or varnish is cut into seal onto the glass at all edges. Many coats are better than one, but it has to be applied with attention to detail. And be prepared to recoat regularly even if it doesn't seem to need it and you'll be fine

As for the laminated door suggested it has merit too, but make sure that both the top and bottom of the door are seal also when finishing and they will need to be regularly too.

john barton asked:

Aug 13, 2015

Marty Brummel of M.K. Brummel PRO answered:

Aug 28, 2015

As beautiful as wood doors can be, they are constant maintenance. They will always have the potential to crack. Now, being that you will have some protection, it will help. If your house is a period style home with wood windows and doors now, then it makes sense to stick with that type of door. If not, normally I would recommend a ThermaTru wood grained fiberglass door unit or possibly a Marvin clad door with a wood interior. Keep in mind that the more divided lites you have in the door, the busier it looks. We have done doors for customers that are 6, 8, and 10 lite that will leave you with a great look, and not take away from the view to the outside. Good Luck!

Marty Brummel

M.K. Brummel, Inc. Fine Remodeling and Building

john barton asked:

Aug 13, 2015

We Sell, Finish, and Install a few hundred doors each year. Real wood doors are beautiful, but they are the hardest to maintain. They also have short warranties. We have solid wood doors available, however most people today are buying lifetime warrantied fiberglass and composite doors that looks so much like wood that most people can't tell a difference. If you have a covered porch you might be ok with a good wood door, but those are hard to find. If you do go all wood, be sure that the door is a laminated veneer solid core door with a 1/4" skin. The LVL will not twist and warp as bad as a solid wood door. I have 16 year old Thermatru Fiberglass doors in my home and they are in just as good a shape now as when I Installed them. Go to www.thermatru.com to learn more about these.

If you are going for a patio door, I would suggest Andersen, with a composite exterior and several species of real wood options on the interior. This would be in their A-Series.  for more info on these: http://www.andersenwindows.com/products/a-series-hinged-patio-door/ If you are in Kansas City, call us for a free consultation 913-262-4380

Doug Bennett 

President/ Owner

All-Weather Window, Doors and Siding, Inc.

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